State Supremes Issue Split Decision on Mardigian

Relish the moment because this is as exciting as probate law gets.

We’ve written about the case before (See: This is Awkward).  Attorney prepares an estate plan (will and trust) for non-relative, leaving millions to said attorney and attorney’s family.

Trial court says: An attorney can’t do that under the rules of professional conduct, and therefore the estate plan is void – on summary disposition.

Court of Appeals reverses the trial court. COA says: While the lawyer may face discipline for the ethics violation, the validity of the trust is not implicated by the ethics rule.  That decision was 2 to 1.

Now, the Michigan Supreme Court reviews the Court of Appeals, and it’s a 3 to 3 tie [The 7th Justice abstains because he was on the COA panel that decided it – and was one of the two votes on the prevailing side.]  Apparently a tie means the COA decision is affirmed.  Who knew?

So the issue is whether a violation of the MRPC rule 1.8(c) which precludes an attorney from creating estate plans for non-relatives in which they receive a benefit has any role in a trial contesting the validity of the estate plan? The answer is “no, it does not.”  While everyone agrees that the attorney is a fiduciary and that, as such, the presumption of undue influence is in play, the prevailing opinion is that the ethics violation, in and of itself, is not a factor in the case.

It’s a Long Decision

As indicated, there are two opinions, each with 3 signatories. In all it’s 53 pages long.  Click here to read the case.

The three who vote to affirm the COA ultimately conclude that it’s not their role to change the law of undue influence to enforce ethical obligations of the bar. The other three see this as an opportunity to do just that.  They assert that the law needs to catch up with changes that have taken place since the last time they reviewed this question more than 50 years ago.

Each opinion includes a lengthy history of undue influence and the presumption. It at least attempts to clarify some of the confusion that has long-existed about the presumption and how it works.  No doubt it will be quoted in litigation going forward. If you do this kind of work, you need to read this case.

They’re Making My Point

The Supremes don’t know it, and likely won’t revisit this issue in my lifetime, but their decision demonstrates the point I was making in my recent post: The Imperfect Bandage of Undue Influence (click on name to read it).  Which point is that the law of undue influence isn’t cutting it.

In both opinions, the Justices get into the weeds of undue influence law, the presumption and how it is rebutted; and both sides seem uncomfortable with how easy it is for the presumption to be undone. Their outrage however is too narrowly focused.  Even the side that would change the law to prevent this result in this case, would only do so in situations where a lawyer is involved.  From my perspective, it is just as outrageous when a child or housekeeper exploits a vulnerable adult.  We need better law.

So, in conclusion, the MSC has spoken. It’s a long opinion, but for true probate geeks, worth the read.

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COA Sets the Record Straight on Priorities

This new published Court of Appeals opinion shouldn’t surprise anyone. The COA holds that where a professional guardian/conservator resigns, and the only adult child of the ward petitions to be appointed guardian and conservator, the probate court cannot appoint a new professional guardian and conservator unless it makes a finding that the child is unsuitable.  That’s because the child has priority to be appointed.  The fact that the probate judge by-passed the child and appointed a new professional fiduciary without such evidence was reversible error.

Click here to read In Re Guardianship/Conservatorship of Harold William Gerstler.

The facts are kind of fun: a devious Aunt, a lazy guardian ad litem; but in the end the COA simply reads the statutes regarding priority of appointments and applies them to the facts.

The only thing curious about this case is that it is published. But perhaps the timing of this publication tells us something.  Perhaps, just maybe, the COA is trying to clean up the confusion left from the recently published (and revised and republished) Brody case which said that the statutory priorities were “merely a guide for the probate court’s exercise of discretion.”  [Check out the post “Better Than Nothing?” for a discussion of that case.]

Significantly, the Gerstler opinion also adopts the position that the standard of proof necessary to by-pass a person with priority is as stated in the Redd case: a preponderance. [Click here to read “Seeing Redd”.]

So, when the issue of appointment of either a guardian or conservator is in play, a party with priority is entitled to appointment unless it is shown by a preponderance of evidence that they are not suitable. That means a probate court has to have a hearing and consider evidence to make this decision. I, for one, am glad that’s clear.

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Medicaid Planners Get Rare Win from COA

The Michigan Court of Appeals has issued an opinion regarding the appropriateness of using probate court protective orders to obtain spousal support orders in situations where such orders impact the calculation of a nursing home resident’s Medicaid “patient pay amount.” The outcome is 80% good for planners, and as such is a refreshing break from the series of punishing COA opinions that have been issued in recent years with respect to Medicaid planning cases.

The case is published, lengthy and involved. Click here to read the combined cases of In Re Joseph VamSach Jr., and In Re Jerome R. Bockes.

For the uninitiated, a “patient pay amount” is the portion of a person’s income that is required to be paid to toward their care when they are in a nursing home receiving long term care Medicaid benefits. The exact amount is a function of Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) policy, which provides a formula for calculating the patient pay amount.  When the nursing home Medicaid beneficiary is married, that formula allows for diversion of income to the “community spouse.” DHHS policy also provides that where a court order directs payment from the nursing home resident to the community spouse, that court order supersedes the formula for determining the amount of income diverted.

In both of the cases before the COA, the local probate court ordered that 100% of the income of the nursing home resident would be paid to the community spouse for their support. These two decisions were appealed by DHHS, represented by the Michigan Attorney General, and the two cases were combined by the Court of Appeals.

The main argument of DHHS was that the probate court lacked jurisdiction to hear these cases. That argument was made on several grounds, all of which failed.  In this decision, the COA holds that probate courts have the authority to grant these orders and that in doing so those courts are not engaged in making DHHS eligibility determinations even though the clear purpose of obtaining such orders may be for that reason.  That’s a big win for the planners.

The COA also holds that the fact that these individuals may have had power of attorneys in place at the time of the petition does not preclude the probate court from getting involved. The COA reasons that the specific form of relief desired (a court order of support) would not be something that an agent acting under a POA could provide, and therefore the court does have jurisdiction to hear these matters.  This holding has potential applications beyond Medicaid planning matters.

After dismissing the primary jurisdictional challenge, the COA ventures into a discussion about how a probate court should decide these cases. The COA holds that in the two cases giving rise to the appeal, the probate courts erred in awarding 100% of the nursing home resident’s income to the community spouse, and vacates both orders and remands the cases.

The COA instructs Michigan’s probate courts that the burden is on the party seeking the order of support to show, by clear and convincing evidence, that the community spouse “needs” the additional income, that it is more than a “want,” and that in deciding whether or how much to award, the probate judge must consider the interests of the institutionalized Medicaid beneficiary and their obligation to contribute toward the costs of their own care. The discussion of this process goes on for several paragraphs, and includes several lengthy footnotes, using, at times, vague and clouded statements to explain how this balance should be struck.  In the end, the opinion seems to intentionally avoid the obvious conclusion that the institutionalized spouse has no real interest in paying anything more than they have to toward their care, as their care remains the same notwithstanding, and that in almost every case the interest of institutionalized spouse would be to divert as much income to support their spouse as possible.  The COA seems to want to direct the probate judge to consider public policy and the interest of the DHHS in making its decision – but they never say that – presumably because there would be not legal basis for doing so.

Importantly, the COA rejects the standard requested by DHHS of “exceptional circumstances resulting in significant financial duress.” But in the same footnote discussion, the COA goes on to say:

… as a matter of common sense, when an incapacitated person needs to be institutionalized to receive full-time medical care, it would be an unusual case for a community spouse’s circumstances to trump the institutionalized spouse’s need for use of his income to pay his medical expenses, particularly when the community spouse has the benefit of the CSMIA. In other words, an institutionalized spouse’s receipt of Medicaid, and a community spouse’s protection under the spousal impoverishment provisions, generally weighs against the entry of a support order.

The result of this case will require more effort in bringing these matters to probate courts in the future. Practitioners will want to establish a record that the probate judge can rely upon to conclude that the burden has been met.  As evidenced by the orders vacated in this appeal, a judge simply concluding that the request was “reasonable” is not good enough.

We should also recognize that while this case is about protective orders used to establish income diversion orders to benefit the community spouse, many of the same rules and standards would presumably apply to the other common use of protective orders in Medicaid planning: orders to establish a protected spousal amount.

In the end, these important planning tools (probate court protective orders) survived the COA and planners should celebrate this decision. It isn’t perfect, but in light of the COA’s prior decisions in this arena, it’s a lot more than might have been expected.

Representing the interests of the elder law bar (as appellees) in these two matters were two renowned elder law practitioners: CT’s own David Shaltz, and my friend and colleague Don Rosenberg.

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Better Than Nothing?

The Michigan Supreme Court has issued an Order denying leave in In Re Conservatorship of Rhea Brody.  However, this same Order “further notes” that the Opinion of the Court of Appeals which was the subject of the request for leave was reformed after the briefs in the case were filed.

Click here to read the Supreme Court Order.

So, a published COA decision is issued. Leave to the MSC is sought.  Briefs are filed, and then the COA revises its opinion so that MSC is satisfied that there is no reason to hear the case. How about that?

I first wrote about this Brody case (there were two of them, a trust case and this conservatorship matter) in the post: Another Brody Bombshell (click on name to visit that post). As discussed at that time, the opinion was riddled with bad law.  As mentioned in another post (Storm Clouds), our firm was hired by the Probate Section of the State Bar to prepare the amicus brief in this matter, which we did.*

The Probate Section wanted only two issues raised:

  1. The finding that the priority given to a “conservator, guardian, or similar fiduciary recognized by the appropriate court of another jurisdiction” could mean an independent trustee over a trust agreement of which the ward was settlor, which trustee was appointed by the same court hearing the conservatorship matter; and
  2. The statement of the Court of Appeals that the statutory priorities for appointment of a conservator “are merely a guide for the probate court’s exercise of discretion.”

I personally also found the case to be worthy of reversal or remand on a third point, which was that the Court appointed a conservator even where a power of attorney was in place and appeared to be effectively handling the affairs of the ward.

The Order of the MSC informs us that the COA has remedied issue number 1 above by issuing a revised opinion.

The second issue is not addressed, and therefore remains problematic language in this published opinion. Presumably we can now argue that appointment of conservators are not controlled by statutory priorities, but are rather left to the discretion of the trial court.

The third issue likewise remains unresolved, and therefore this case seems to stand in opposition to other cases, such as In Re Bittner.

Click here to read the COA Brody opinion as revised.

Better than nothing, I suppose.

*[Much thanks to CT Attorney Drummond Black for his excellent work on the amicus brief.]

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The Imperfect Bandage of Undue Influence

A rant this morning. Something to think about over your Sunday morning coffee (or tea).

Our firm starts lawsuits involving vulnerable adult exploitation as much as anyone I suppose. And we almost always plead two things: incapacity and undue influence.  While in some cases the evidence may support the proposition that the person really was so cognitively impaired that they didn’t know what they were doing, most often that is not the case.  Most often we plead incapacity in order to introduce the idea that this person’s capacity was impaired to the point that it reduced the level of persuasion that would be necessary to overcome their volition = undue influence.

For those who practice in this area, they know how difficult it is to win a case on undue influence. You have to show that the victim was essentially a conduit through which the bad actor achieved their objective – that the free will of the victim was completely overwhelmed by the power of the undue influencer.  The so-called “presumption of undue influence” can be a help, but most court cases hold that the presumption, even where it is established, can be rebutted with nominal evidence.  In any event, the presumption is not the topic today.

My point (or argument) today is that we rely on undue influence because we don’t have anything better. We don’t have law that reflects the reality of the aging process today.

I have discussed the research of Dr. Lichtenberg before (see Peter’s Principles and Our Evolving Understanding of Exploitation). His work, and the experience of those of us who handle these cases, informs us that older people can be exploited because of circumstances that have nothing to do with cognitive impairment – that exploitation can occur simply because an older person loses their sense of control, dignity and/or empowerment.

These cases don’t fit well into any current legal theory. But the best we have is undue influence. Other legal theories like unconscionability, mistake, fraud  and constructive trust are available, but like undue influence, these theories are imperfect for our purposes.

The most promising development is the concept of a “vulnerable adult,” which recently entered the legal lexicon. It now appears in the criminal code and in policy for adult protective services workers.  But it has yet to find its place in the civil and probate world. Perhaps the concept of vulnerable adult exploitation will lead to new civil theories and remedies.  But we have to be mindful of what that would mean.

If we move the goalpost, as it were, from incapacity to vulnerable adult, are we going too far? There are good reasons that incapacity has served as the bright line for (1) court jurisdiction to invade the rights of an individual through a guardianship or conservatorship, and (2) as grounds for setting aside estate planning documents, deeds, beneficiary designations and contracts entered into by adults who are presumed to have the ability to understand what they are giving up and what they are getting in return.  Is it a good idea to reduce the proofs necessary for either or both of these outcomes?

Societal changes triggered by modern medicine and the resulting explosion of people living to an advanced age have come upon us quickly. The law evolves slowly, but evolve it must.  Elder law attorneys and probate litigators are struggling to find legal theories to adequately address the civil injuries impacting our clients and their family members.  Undue influence is an imperfect bandage, but for now, it’s the best we’ve got.

 

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POST Set to Join Michigan’s Medical Directive Stew

When it comes to medical care advance directives, we Michiganders have patient advocate designations, advance directives, and do not resuscitate orders. Soon, it appears, we will also have POST forms.  Laws requiring the development of, and allowing for the use of, POST (or Physician’s Order for Scope of Treatment) forms in Michigan have now been passed by both houses and are awaiting the anticipated signature of Governor Snyder.  UPDATE:  The Governor has approved these bills.  The law has an effective date of February 6, 2018.

A POST form is a document that would be signed by a patient and their doctor which would provide direction for the treatment of a specific condition, which direction could include end-of-life choices. The expressions in the form would continue to have effect even if the patient subsequently becomes unable to make their own medical decisions.

A POST form differs significantly from a patient advocate designation or advance directive in that a person may not unilaterally create them. They are created by the patient in consultation with their medical care provider.

Waiting for It. Once these new bills are signed into law, State agencies will initiate a process to develop a standardized form. The use of POST forms will be delayed until that process is complete.  This process could take years.

Let’s look at the soon-to-be new law:

  • A guardian and a patient advocate will have authority to create a POST form for a person who is unable to make their own healthcare choices.
  • A POST form remains revocable by the patient or their representative (PAD or Guardian). A patient may revoke a POST form orally or in writing.
  • If a patient has a pre-existing patient advocate designation that includes an advance directive regarding end-of-life care that is inconsistent with the expression in a POST form, the POST form will take precedence, being treated as a more current expression. Likewise, to the extent inconsistent, a POST form would trump a previously executed do-not-resuscitate order.
  • A POST form expires in one year from the date of creation, or sooner if there is an “unexpected change” in the patient’s medical condition, if the patient moves to a new facility or to a new care level, and if the patient gets a new attending health professional. They may be continued beyond one year upon agreement of the patient or their representative (PAD or Guardian) and the attending medical provider.
  • POST forms would be controlling in institutional care settings, including adult foster care homes; and in the case of an EMS event, outside of institutional care.
  • The probate court has jurisdiction to determine the validity of a POST form. The basis for challenging a POST form would be that the POST form expressions are contrary to the patient’s wishes or best interests.

To read the law, you will want to look at the four House Bills that make up the package of legislation. Most of the law is in House Bill 4070.  Additional changes are in House Bills 4171, 4173 and 4174.  Click on the numbers to read the bills.  What you will see is that the law is mainly in the public health code, with a few conforming changes to EPIC and the Adult Foster Care Licensing Act.

POST forms have been used in some parts of Michigan (without legal authority) for many years. For the record, Jackson County seems to have been the first to implement their usage some 15 years ago.  Other counties have used them for the past few years as part of a pilot program.

POST forms, sometimes referred to as POLST forms (Physician’s Order of Life Sustaining Treatment), are currently in use in several other states. For a good discussion of POST/POLST forms, go to the National POLST Paradigm website by clicking on the name.

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Lay Witness Testimony Regarding Cognitive Impairment

In the recently unpublished Court of Appeals case of Rebecca L. Clemence Revocable Trust (click on name to read the case), the trial judge essentially granted summary disposition in a trust contest case, without summary disposition even having been requested. In doing so, the trial judge expressed frustration that the matter had continued for so long and that, in the judge’s opinion, inadequate evidence of wrongdoing had been discovered.

The Court of Appeals reversed and remanded.

What I find helpful about the case is the COA’s discussion of lay witness testimony as evidence regarding incapacity. We have discussed before the growing inclination of court’s to look for medical evidence as the last word on incapacity and vulnerability.  One of the challenges of handling capacity and undue influence cases is that very few people happened to have medical evaluations done contemporaneously with the event in question.

The portion of this case which I will keep in my notes, provides authority for the proposition that the observations of lay witnesses are admissible evidence of incapacity and, if sufficient, can preclude summary disposition. Specifically, this portion of the opinion is on point:

Certainly it would be easier to prove whether Rebecca possessed testamentary capacity or was vulnerable to undue influence if the probate court could review medical records contemporaneous with her estate plan amendment. But such records are not the only method of proof. A lay witness may place his or her opinions into evidence as long as they “are (a) rationally based on the perception of the witness and (b) helpful to a clear understanding of the witness’ testimony or the determination of a fact in issue.” MRE 701. And our Supreme Court has specifically found lay opinion testimony admissible to establish a decedent’s testamentary capacity. See In re Moxon’s Estate, 234 Mich 170, 173-173; 207 NW 924 (1926) (holding that a lay witness “who [has] had the opportunity to observe and talk to [the decedent]” may form “impressions” of the decedent’s testamentary capacity and may cite examples for the factfinder’s consideration);

Proving that an older person suffered from cognitive impairments at that time they executed a document being contested is central to nearly every will and trust contest or case of financial exploitation. Lack of Capacity and Undue Influence remain the most common theories of probate and elder law litigation.  These are often fact-rich cases and discovery is frequently extensive.  Trial judges may have limited patience and are under pressure to close cases expeditiously.  Many trial judges also have a strong inclination to require medical evidence in cases where cognitive impairment is a factor, but such evidence is not always available.  As a result, introducing lay testimony to establish cognitive decline is necessary, and often the best evidence available.  In those cases, it is not unusual when presenting such lay witnesses, for the opposing counsel to assert that the lay witness has no medical training and therefore their testimony should not be allowed.  This case supports the proposition that such objections should not prevail.  Lay people can observe behavior in older adults that suggests impairment, and those observations can be admitted and relied upon by a fact-finder.

 

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Share and Share Alike

This is an unpublished will construction case. To read In Re Estate of Eugenie Dietrich, click on the name.

In other posts (see for instance Who Gets the Grow Lamps?) we’ve seen the problems that arise when attorneys fail to use the precise legal terms of art. In this case, we see the problems that arise when lawyers toss in archaic legal language.

The will says: “To Peter Dietrich and Johann Dietrich, my sons, to be divided between them in equal shares, share and share alike.”

Turns out Johann predeceased Eugenie. So Peter says: “it’s all mine.”  Johann’s issue took exception.  The trial court agreed with Johann’s children, and ordered that they would take their deceased father’s share.  The Court of Appeals affirmed.

Michigan law strongly favors construction of estate planning instruments that vests the interests of predeceasing family members in their descendants. That’s what our “anti-lapse” rules are for.  See MCL 700.2603.  Those anti-lapse rules however can be rebutted with sufficient evidence of a contrary intent.  This case offers a discussion of class gifts versus individual gifts and the rules of construction that apply, with specific focus on the meaning of the term “share and share alike.”  A good read perhaps for younger lawyers developing their drafting style.

As for the phrase “share and share alike,” I think the lesson is: don’t use it. I’ve seen it many times but have never understood why it would be used when there are better ways of expressing a client’s intentions regarding what is to be done with property if a devisee predeceases.

Perhaps the attraction is that it sounds so fine – so high minded – “share and share alike.” Almost like a blessing- “go forth and prosper,” “live and let live,” “do unto others.” It has that kind of musical or poetic quality.  But our goal in drafting estate planning documents is not to be poetic, rather to be clear.

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Meritless is Good. Frivolous would have been Better.

This is a Chalgian and Tripp case just handed down from the Court of Appeals. Unpublished.  Click here to read In Re Conservatorship of Ueal E. Patrick.

Ueal is a prominent business man in Jackson. He was involved in litigation.  Ueal’s health was declining and the stress of the litigation was making it worse.  In the context of working with him on a separate trust matter, we suggested that it might be beneficial to have his child Mark act as his conservator so that he (Mark) could handle the litigation.  Mark was already deeply involved in the management of the business, and very sophisticated in business matters.  In addition, predating all this was a power of attorney created by Ueal, appointing Mark as his agent, and nominating Mark as conservator should that become necessary.

A hearing was held at which several attorneys were present. The opposing parties did not contest that the appointment of a conservator was appropriate.  They simply opposed the appointment of Mark.  They presented no evidence, called no witnesses, merely made legal arguments.

On appeal, the appellant argued that the trial court erred in finding Ueal to be a person in need of a conservator, even though they stipulated to it in their pleadings and in court. They argued that the trial court erred by not requiring an independent medical exam be conducted to determine the amount of weight that should be given to Ueal’s nomination of Mark.  And they argued that Mark should not have been appointed because he had a conflict of interest with respect to the other matters being separately litigated.

The COA goes through each of appellant’s arguments, systematically pointing out the deficits in their reasoning. At various points the COA labels their arguments “abandoned,” “without merit,” and “meritless.” I beat up on our COA enough in this forum.  They got this one right.  I appreciate it.

Thanks to our John Mabley for doing an excellent job briefing the case and helping the COA clearly see the deficiencies in appellant’s positions.

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Another Brody Bombshell

UPDATE:  This decision was subsequently revised.  Some of the problematic aspects of the COA opinion were corrected.  See Better Than Nothing? for details.

 

This is a published Court of Appeals opinion involving the appointment of a conservator over an adult under EPIC. Click here to read In Re Conservatorship of Rhea Brody.

This case comes out of same family that was involved in the In Re Rhea Brody Living Trust, which case is the topic of the post earlier this month. That prior case dealt with the Rhea Brody Trust, and offered the surprising revelation that a contingent beneficiary of a Trust could contest the actions of the Trustee even while the trust remained revocable.  Click here to read that post.  This second Brody case deals with the appointment of a conservator for Ms. Brody.

The litigants in the case are aligned similarly. In the Trust matter, husband and son were aligned in defending the removal of husband as Trustee, which arose as a result of favorable business dealings between the husband as trustee and the son; which dealings were perceived as being done to the detriment of the daughter, a contingent beneficiary.  In this case, husband and son oppose appointment of a conservator, which appointment is supported by daughter.  The court appointed an attorney who was also acting as Trustee of Rhea’s Trust to serve as her conservator.  The COA affirms.

The husband, as appellant, contests pretty much every aspect of the trial court’s decision, except the finding that Rhea was incompetent. The conclusions of the COA are intriguing.  Look for this case to be cited often by litigators seeking to impose conservators and desiring to by-pass priorities of appointment.  To some extent, perhaps a large extent, this case is the counter balance to In Re Bittner, a relatively recent published opinion addressed in the post “Bittner’s Bite” (click on name to read that post).  In Bittner, the COA chastised a trial judge for imposing a conservator where the requirements of EPIC were not met.  Here, the COA goes to great lengths to justify the appointment over seemingly problematic facts.

One issue relates to whether the evidence supported the finding that appointment of a conservator was necessary to provide for management of assets and avoid waste. In this case the evidence is that husband was agent under a valid POA for Rhea, and further, that all of her assets (except one IRA) were joint with husband.  Further, husband alleges that the IRA was set up to make minimum required distributions annually.  The basis for finding necessity appears to be the conclusion that husband wasn’t really managing these matters, but rather that he had “abdicated” his role to the son, and that son was a potentially devious manipulator of the situation.  The COA goes so far as to suggest that the appointment of a conservator was necessary so that someone independent could review the tax returns.

Which leads to another conclusion of law by the COA in this matter: that the appointment of a conservator does not require a finding that there has been waste of assets, only that such waste could occur in the future. So reasonably founded speculation is enough.

Additionally, and perhaps most concerning, are the findings of the COA with respect to the priority of appointment. The COA cites MCL 700.5409(1)(a)  for the proposition that an independent fiduciary has priority over a spouse and agent under a POA where the POA nominates the agent as conservator. MCL 700.5409(1)(a) says:

(1) The court may appoint an individual, a corporation authorized to exercise fiduciary powers, or a professional conservator described in section 5106 to serve as conservator of a protected individual’s estate. The following are entitled to consideration for appointment in the following order of priority:

(a) A conservator, guardian of property, or similar fiduciary appointed or recognized by the appropriate court of another jurisdiction in which the protected individual resides.

I have always understood this section to mean that a conservator previously appointed by another court would have priority. In this case, the COA seems to say that a professional fiduciary appointed as Trustee over the ward’s Trust by this same Court meets that definition.  The COA states:

Under MCL 700.5409, a protected individual’s spouse is entitled to consideration for appointment as conservator, and is granted priority over all other individuals except “[a] conservator, guardian of property, or similar fiduciary appointed or recognized by the appropriate court of another jurisdiction in which the protected individual resides,” MCL 700.5409(1)(a), and “[a]n individual or corporation nominated by the protected individual if he or she is 14 years of age or older and of sufficient mental capacity to make an intelligent choice, including a nomination made in a durable power of attorney,” MCL 700.5409(1)(b). As Rhea’s husband, Robert was an individual entitled to priority consideration. However, Robert was not entitled to consideration unless the probate court considered an independent fiduciary and found him or her unsuitable. Lyneis, as trustee and independent fiduciary, had statutory priority over Robert, despite Robert’s marriage to Rhea. MCL 700.5409(1).

Wait – WHAT? Where is the other jurisdiction?

Further, and maybe even more unsettling, the COA says:

The statute’s priority classifications are merely a guide for the probate court’s exercise of discretion.

Really?  This statement seems to fly in the face of a long line of cases that require a finding of unsuitability – including, perhaps ironically, the case of In re Guardianship of Dorothy Redd, which is the topic of the other post I wrote today, a case issued by a separate panel of the COA on the same date as this matter.

That said, the COA goes on to say that the husband is unsuitable, again, because the son is a manipulative fellow and may use his influence over husband to Rhea’s detriment in the future.

There are other issues addressed in this case, but I think I’ve hit the ones that seem most significant, and that are those most likely to be cited by litigators in the future.

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